The Manhattan Project

In partnership with the National Museum of Nuclear Science & HistoryNational Museum of Nuclear Science & History

Department of Energy

Tom Foulds's Interview

Trisha Pritikin: Okay. It is January 15th, 2019, and we are in Lynnwood, Washington. I am interviewing Tom Foulds. Tom, would you please spell your name? 

Tom Foulds: Yeah. Tom T-o-m, Foulds F as in Frank, o-u-l-d-s.

Pritikin: Okay. Thank you very much. Now, Tom I’m going to ask you a set of questions, but feel free to add something else if you think of something as we go along.

I’ll be asking you some questions, and Karen [Dorn Steele] will be asking you some questions.

Richard Eymann's Interview

Karen Dorn Steele: Our second interview is with Richard Eymann, Spokane attorney and lead trial attorney for the Hanford downwinders.

Trisha Pritikin: Okay. We are interviewing Richard Eymann. It is April 29, 2019. We are in Spokane, Washington at the Patsy Clark Mansion. Dick—may I call you Dick?

Dick Eymann: Dick or Richard is fine.

Pritikin: What type of law did you practice prior to becoming involved in the Hanford Downwinder Litigation?

Bob Cook's Interview

Karen Dorn Steele: It's April 29, 2019. Our first interview is with F. Robert Cook, a retired Nuclear Regulatory Commission overseer at Hanford Reservation. First, why don’t you tell us a little bit about your background—where you grew up and something about your early education?

Bob Cook

Bob Cook is a nuclear engineer. He began his career by working with Naval Reactors and he helped create the structural design base for reactors, which later became the design basis for all nuclear power plants. From 1963 to 1988 he worked for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. He also worked as a consultant for the Yakama Nation.

John Price's Interview

Cindy Kelly: Okay. I’m Cindy Kelly. It is September 11, 2018. I’m in Richland, Washington, and I have with me John Price. My first request is to please say your full name and spell it.

John Price: Sure. My name is John Price, J-o-h-n P-r-i-c-e. I am the Tri-Party Agreement Section Manager for the Washington Department of Ecology Nuclear Waste Program.

Kelly: Wow. That’s a mouthful.

Price: Sure.

John Price

John Price is an environmental lawyer who has been working on radioactive waste cleanup projects for more than 35 years. Currently, he is the Tri-Party Agreement Section Manager for the Washington Department of Ecology Nuclear Waste Program.

In this interview, he discusses the Tri-Party Agreement and the role it plays in ensuring the cleanup of Hanford site. He also talks about the political and the technical problems the Department of Ecology and the US Department of Energy face when trying to cleanup the area. 

Keith Klein's Interview

Cindy Kelly: Okay. I’m Cindy Kelly. I’m in Richland, Washington, and it’s Monday, September 10, 2018. I have with me Keith Klein, and my first question for him is to say his name and spell it.

Keith Klein: Keith Klein, K-l-e-i-n.

Kelly:  Terrific.

Klein:  I passed, huh?

Dennis Faulk's Interview

Cynthia Kelly: I'm Cindy Kelly. It is September 11, 2018. I have with me. Dennis Faulk. And my first question is to please say your name and spell it.

Dennis Faulk: Dennis Faulk, D-E-N-N-I-S F-A-U-L-K.

Kelly: Terrific. 

Kelly: You had an illustrious career with the Environmental Protection Agency. 

Faulk: It was a great place to work.

Dennis Faulk

Dennis Faulk served as the project manager of the Hanford Environmental Protection Agency.  He began working for the EPA in 1991, after leaving his position as an Agriculture teacher. In this interview, Faulk explains the early years of Superfund cleanups in the 1990s, forming the Hanford Advisory Board, and the EPA’s relationship with the Department of Energy at Hanford.

 

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