The Manhattan Project

Working Conditions

Karen Dorn Steele's Interview

Trisha Pritikin: We are in Lynnwood, Washington. Karen, can you spell your name and say your name, please?

Karen Dorn Steele: Yeah. So, my name’s Karen Dorn Steele. K-a-r-e-n D-o-r-n S-t-e-e-l-e.

Pritikin: Okay. I’d like to start with having you tell us, please, about your early life overseas growing up as the child of a press liaison for the U.S. Information Agency.

Karen Dorn Steele

Karen Dorn Steele is a journalist. As a reporter for the Spokesman Review, she broke the story about the Green Run test, in which the U.S. government released radioactive gases in 1949 over areas surrounding the Hanford Site. Subsequently, she covered the Hanford Downwinder Litigation, in which residents living around the Hanford Site from the 1940s through the 1960s were suing the federal government for the health complications they suffered from as a result of the exposure to radiation from Hanford. 

John Price

John Price is an environmental lawyer who has been working on radioactive waste cleanup projects for more than 35 years. Currently, he is the Tri-Party Agreement Section Manager for the Washington Department of Ecology Nuclear Waste Program.

In this interview, he discusses the Tri-Party Agreement and the role it plays in ensuring the cleanup of Hanford site. He also talks about the political and the technical problems the Department of Ecology and the US Department of Energy face when trying to cleanup the area. 

Glenn Schweitzer's Interview

Cindy Kelly: I am Cindy Kelly, Atomic Heritage Foundation, in Washington, DC. It is June 27, 2018, and I have with me Glenn Schweitzer. My first question is to ask him to please say and spell his name.

Glenn Schweitzer: I am Glenn Schweitzer, G-l-e-n-n S-c-h-w-e-i-t-z-e-r.

Kelly: Perfect.

Schweitzer: No errors.

Keith Klein's Interview

Cindy Kelly: Okay. I’m Cindy Kelly. I’m in Richland, Washington, and it’s Monday, September 10, 2018. I have with me Keith Klein, and my first question for him is to say his name and spell it.

Keith Klein: Keith Klein, K-l-e-i-n.

Kelly:  Terrific.

Klein:  I passed, huh?

Dennis Faulk's Interview

Cynthia Kelly: I'm Cindy Kelly. It is September 11, 2018. I have with me. Dennis Faulk. And my first question is to please say your name and spell it.

Dennis Faulk: Dennis Faulk, D-E-N-N-I-S F-A-U-L-K.

Kelly: Terrific. 

Kelly: You had an illustrious career with the Environmental Protection Agency. 

Faulk: It was a great place to work.

John Fox's Interview

Cindy Kelly: I’m Cindy Kelly. It is September 11, 2018, and I have with me John Fox. I’d like him to start by saying his full name and spelling it.

John Fox: All right. My full name is John Fox. J-o-h-n F-o-x. I’ve always been grateful that I had a short name.

Kelly:  John, I know you’ve had an illustrious career here. I want you to start from the beginning, when and where you were born and how you came to—

Tom Carpenter's Interview

Cynthia Kelly: It is Wednesday, September 12, 2018. I’m Cindy Kelly, and I have with me Tom Carpenter. I would first like him to tell us his full name, and spell it.  

Tom Carpenter: Okay. It’s Thomas Everett Carpenter, and it’s T-H-O-M-A-S and then Carpenter, C-A-R-P-E-N-T-E-R.

Kelly: So if you can tell us where and when you were born, and how you came to be so involved in Hanford issues?

Tom Carpenter

Tom Carpenter is a lawyer and the executive director of Hanford Challenge, a nonprofit watchdog and advocacy organization focused on the Hanford Nuclear Site. In this interview, Carpenter discusses founding the Hanford Challenge, and the struggle to enforce safety and environmental protocols at reprocessing plants in Cincinnati and Hanford. He describes the challenges of the cleanup effort at Hanford, including the waste tanks and the problems that have plagued the construction of the Vitrification Plant.

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