The Manhattan Project

Military-Civilian Relations

Samuel K. Allison's Interview

Stephane Groueff: Where did you come from? Probably we’ll start chronologically and then—

Dr. Samuel K. Allison: I was born here in Chicago, just half a kilometer from where we’re sitting at this moment. I went to school at the public schools in the city of Chicago and entered the University of Chicago in 1917. I got my PhD in 1923, went away for six years, but have been here ever since. So, I’ve been here ever since 1929, 1930.

Groueff: Teaching or research?

Lester Tenney's Interview

Cindy Kelly: Today is December 3, 2013. I’m Cindy Kelly, President of the Atomic Heritage Foundation. With me, I have Lester Tenney. I’m going to start by asking Lester to say your name and spell it please.

Lester Tenney: Lester Tenney, L-E-S-T-E-R, Tenney, T-E-N-N-E-Y.

Maybe you could start by telling us where you were born and what your childhood was like?

George Allen's interview

George Allen: Alright. This is in Alexandria, Louisiana at the city park. My name is George Allen. G-E-O-R-G-E, A-L-L-E-N.

Interviewer: Alright and where was your place and date of birth?

Allen: I was born right in Alexandria on September the 10th, 1925.

Interviewer: Okay. How did you first become involved with the Army Air Force?

Grace Groves's Interview

Stephane Groueff: We said that the nickname of the General was “DNO.”

Grace Groves: DNO.

Groueff: And your children even now the grandchildren and yourself, call him DNO.

Groves: He's also known as Dick. 

Groueff: Dick?

Groves: By his friends, yes. 

Groueff: Why Dick?

Groves: You see his name is Richard, and that’s the nickname for Dick. 

Groueff: Richard. 

William Lowe's Interview

William Lowe:  I was born in Bartlesville, Oklahoma in the year 1920. Within a few years, my parents had moved to Westfield, New Jersey, where I grew up. But upon reaching 18, I went to college at Purdue University. It was 700 miles from home. By train, it took a day. 

I would say that my 93 years have been dominated by atomic bombs, war, in particular World War II, and later by peaceful uses of atomic energy. What I will do is try to convey, more or less chronologically, what happened.

Robert Holmberg's Interview

Robert Holmberg: I’m Robert W. Holmberg, H-O-L-M-B-E-R-G, Bob Holmberg. And I like to tell people I’ve never had an honest job. I’ve worked for the Manhattan Project or its predecessors all my life. I’m an Iowan by birth; Fort Dodge, Iowa. As a little boy I was interested in chemistry. I went to college and got my degree at Ames, Iowa. Iowa State College then, it is Iowa State University now.

Haskell Sheinberg's Interview

Cindy Kelly: My name is Cindy Kelly, it is Wednesday, July 31st, 2013, and I’m here with Haskell Sheinberg. And the first question to him is, please tell us your name and spell it.

Haskell Sheinberg: My name is Haskell Sheinberg. And the first name is H-A-S-K-E-L-L, last name S-H-E-I-N-B-E-R-G.

Kelly: Perfect. 

Sheinberg: I haven’t lost that much memory anyway.

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