The Manhattan Project

In partnership with the National Museum of Nuclear Science & HistoryNational Museum of Nuclear Science & History

Manhattan, NY

David Fox

David Fox’s father, Dr. Marvin Fox, studied physics at Columbia University under Isidor Rabi and Harold Urey. Marvin Fox worked at the Radiation Laboratory at MIT and at Columbia during the Manhattan Project. After the war, he served as Chairman of the Reactor Department at Brookhaven National Laboratory, where he helped build the first reactor dedicated to peaceful uses of atomic energy. In this interview, David Fox describes his father’s work at Brookhaven, idealism about technology, and how the onset of the Cold War affected him.

Ralph Gates

Ralph Gates is a chemical and electrical engineer who worked on the Manhattan Project as a part of the Special Engineer Detachment. His primary job was casting shape charges for the plutonium bombs.

Irwin P. Sharpe's Interview

Cindy Kelly: I’m Cindy Kelly, Atomic Heritage Foundation, and it’s Friday, May 15, 2015, and I’m in Middlebury, Vermont, with Irwin P. Sharpe. And, my first question for him is to tell us your name and spell it.

Irwin Sharpe: Oh, I know that. Okay. It’s Irwin, I-r-w-i-n, initial P, Sharpe, S-h-a-r-p-e.

Irwin P. Sharpe

Irwin P. Sharpe was born in 1921. He was recruited for the Manhattan Project by his employer, General Electric, after he graduated from the University of Michigan with a degree in engineering in 1942. His work took place in the Woolworth Building in Manhattan, where he played a key role in developing pumps and seals to transport gas and oil.

Clare Whitehead

Clare Whitehead joind the Women's Army Auxiliary Corps (WAAC) in 1943. After training in the Manhattan Engineer District and working in Oak Ridge, she was recruited to be the "secretary safeguarding military information" at Hanford. She met her husband, Vincent "Bud" Whitehead in 1944 while they were both serving at Hanford. 

John Manley's Interview (1965) - Part 1

Stephane Groueff: Yes, Dr. Manley, from the beginning. Then I’ll start asking questions.

John Manley: Alright, fine. I guess the first relevant business is the fact that I went to Columbia in ‘34. I was sort of on the fringe. I worked mostly with [Isidor] Rabi for the first couple of years.

Groueff: You are a chemist?

Manley: No, I’m a physicist.

Groueff: Physicist?

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