The Manhattan Project

In partnership with the National Museum of Nuclear Science & HistoryNational Museum of Nuclear Science & History

Hanford, WA

Jerry Saucier

Jerry Saucier came to Hanford from Massachusetts at age 26 to work for DuPont. After the war he settled in Richland. In this interview, Saucier recalls the many shocks of coming to live at Hanford and how the experience made him become independent.

Jack Miller's Interview

[At top is the edited version of the interview published by S. L. Sanger in Working on the Bomb: An Oral History of WWII Hanford, Portland State University, 1995.

For the full transcript of part 1 of the interview that matches the audio of the interview, please scroll down.]

Book Version:

Hope Sloan Amacker

Hope Sloan was 25 in 1944, a dark-haired WAC corporal and secretary in military intelligence. In July, she joined the construction camp's morale-building effort by entering a beauty contest, part of an "exposition "promoting safety on and off the job. Miss Sloan, already Sweetheart of the Hanford Engineer Works, won the exposition's Queen of Safety title.

George Graves's Interview

[At top is the edited version of the interview published by S. L. Sanger in Working on the Bomb: An Oral History of WWII Hanford, Portland State University, 1995.

For the full transcript that matches the audio of the interview, please scroll down.]

Book version:

George Graves

George Graves was a technical advisor at Hanford, and so famous there that he inspired a poem.

We'd called up a tight design

Hewn strictly to the longhairs' line.

To us, it looked almighty fine -A honey, we'd insist.

But Old Marse George, with baleful glare

And with a roar that shook the air,

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