The Manhattan Project

In partnership with the National Museum of Nuclear Science & HistoryNational Museum of Nuclear Science & History

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Hugh Taylor's Interview

Sir Hugh Taylor: I had been requested by the British Government to find out certain things. They wanted, for example, to know whether they could use this thing and the General Electric Company made it available to them on the condition that their affiliate in England was entrusted with the responsibility of supplying it. It was the British Thomson-Houston Company [in] Rugby.

Then another job that I did for them, I got the Shell Oil Company in California to give me—

Stephane Groueff: Shell Oil.

Hugh Taylor

Sir Hugh Taylor was a British-born chemist and the first man to create pure, radioactive heavy water.

Taylor, a professor of Chemistry at Princeton University, joined the Kellex Corporation during the Manhattan Project. After working on the heavy water problem in Trail, British Columbia, Taylor helped design the barrier to be used for uranium separation at the K-25 Plant in Oak Ridge, Tennessee.

William E. Tewes' Interview (September 2013)

Cindy Kelly: This is Cindy Kelly. It is September 6, 2013. I am in Oak Ridge, Tennessee with Bill Tewes. So Bill, can you tell us your name and spell it?

Tewes: Sure. My name is William Edward Tewes. And the first and second names are obvious, but to spell my last name, it is T-E-W-E-S. My father and my children all pronounce it “Tewes.” The rest of my older family, including my grandparents, pronounced it “Teweys.” And my Uncle Elmer would remark, “Any fool should know it’s pronounced Teweys because there are two E’s in the name.”

George Cowan's Interview (1993)

George Cowan: What you’ve learned from the Russians, for example?

Richard Rhodes: The main thing I have learned is that their first bomb was a carbon copy of Fat Man.

Cowan Cowan: Well of course. I knew that in 1949, about the middle of September of ’49 because we analyzed the debris from that and it was clear that it was a carbon copy.

John Manley

John Manley was an American physicist and a member of the Calculations Group (group T-5) at Los Alamos during the Manhattan Project.

Manley was a research associate in the Metallurgical Laboratory at the University of Chicago in 1942 when he was recruited for the Project. He was among the first group of scientists that arrived on the Hill in April 1943 and helped with construction of laboratory buildings and the installation of a Cockcroft-Walton Generator, which he brought with him from the University of Illinois.

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