The Manhattan Project

Atomic Heritage Foundation

Ronald E. Mickens' Interview

Cindy Kelly: I’m Cindy Kelly, Atomic Heritage Foundation, in Washington, D.C. It is July 30, 2018. I have with me Ronald Mickens, and I’d like him to tell his full name and spell it.

Ronald Mickens: My full name is Ronald, spelled the usual way, R-o-n-a-l-d, Elbert, E-l-b-e-r-t, Mickens, M-i-c-k-e-n-s. I was born in Petersburg, Virginia, right down the road, February 7, 1943.

Tom Foulds's Interview

Trisha Pritikin: Okay. It is January 15th, 2019, and we are in Linwood, Washington. I am interviewing Tom Foulds. Tom, would you please spell your name? 

Tom Foulds: Yeah. Tom T-o-m, Foulds F as in Frank, o-u-l-d-s.

Pritikin: Okay. Thank you very much. Now, Tom I’m going to ask you a set of questions, but feel free to add something else if you think of something as we go along.

I’ll be asking you some questions, and Karen [Dorn Steele] will be asking you some questions.

Richard Eymann's Interview

Karen Dorn Steele: Our second interview is with Richard Eymann, Spokane attorney and lead trial attorney for the Hanford downwinders.

Trisha Pritikin: Okay. We are interviewing Richard Eymann. It is April 29, 2019. We are in Spokane, Washington at the Patsy Clark Mansion. Dick—may I call you Dick?

Dick Eymann: Dick or Richard is fine.

Pritikin: What type of law did you practice prior to becoming involved in the Hanford Downwinder Litigation?

Bob Cook's Interview

Karen Dorn Steele: It's April 29, 2019. Our first interview is with F. Robert Cook, a retired Nuclear Regulatory Commission overseer at Hanford Reservation. First, why don’t you tell us a little bit about your background—where you grew up and something about your early education?

George Warren Reed's Interview (2006)

Mark Morrison-Reed: How would you describe your mother, grandmother, Mary Elizabeth?

George Warren Reed: She was a tough cookie. Nobody crossed her. She ran a tight ship. Never held back. She always gave.

Mark: What was Sarah like in comparison? Were they similar, different? What was Sarah like?

George: I wasn’t around Sarah, but, you know, a couple of months during the summer.

Mark: Right.

Karen Dorn Steele's Interview

Trisha Pritikin: We are in Lynnwood, Washington. Karen, can you spell your name and say your name, please?

Karen Dorn Steele: Yeah. So, my name’s Karen Dorn Steele. K-a-r-e-n D-o-r-n S-t-e-e-l-e.

Pritikin: Okay. I’d like to start with having you tell us, please, about your early life overseas growing up as the child of a press liaison for the U.S. Information Agency.

Collene Dunbar's Interview

Cynthia Kelly: Okay, why don’t we start by having you tell us your name and spelling it?

Collene Dunbar: My name is Collene Dunbar, C-O-L-L-E-N-E, and it’s pronounced Coll-ene.

Jeffrey Nalezny: And your last name is spelled?

Dunbar: D-U-N-B-A-R.

Nalezny: Thank you.

Kelly: Great! Thank you very much. Now we’re here to talk to about your life, your life in Richland. So can you tell us when you came here and why?

Carol Roberts's Interview

Cynthia Kelly: Start by telling us your name and spelling it.

Carol Roberts: Okay, my name is Carol B. Roberts. C-A-R-O-L, initial B, as in Bobby, R-O-B-E-R-T-S. I came here in June 1944 with my mother and my sisters because my dad had been sent by DuPont out here. That is how I came to be such a smart aleck.

Kelly: Where did you live before?

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